ZigAA

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ZigAA last won the day on August 17 2011

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About ZigAA

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  1. hello, policy based routing works on packets that are goig through router, not originating from it. For traffic originating from router, you need to apply "ip local policy route-map" command. Here's an explanation http://packetlife.net/blog/2009/nov/30/local-policy-routing/ hope it helps...
  2. I didn't understood your explanation, but I remember reading something abot this too. First - you don't need to know this for any exam and neither these infos aren't usable in practise life But I was curious like you and found following informations. Once upon a time, there were 3Mbit links and coax cables. These cables could be 500m long and you could in theory connect hubs on them and in serial connection used 5links: PC link - hub - link - hub - link - hub - link - PC This is so called 5-3-5 rule or something. And signal took some time to pass from one PC to another PC. In this time, first PC already transmitted 64bytes of data when first byte arrived on second PC. That's why minumum frame size iz 64k. Something like that... here's more info http://bharathi.posterous.com/minimum-ethernet-framepacket-size nice thing to see that someone else is interesting in weard things
  3. huh, you have crappy providers Your provider should provide bandwidth 24/7. I would recommend changing providers but back to technical solution: you can use SLA probes and when congestion occurs, you can shutdown BGP and traffic will go to second provider. or you can use route-map which set next-hop address. You should also concern incomming traffic. You can manipulate it with AS-path prepending or simply shutdown bgp. It's a lot of work and small chance of success. I would suggest changing ISP..
  4. if you know IP address of that device, you connect to gateway for it's device and check show arp | include (ip). Now you find our devices mac address and you go on switch and perform show mac-address | include (mac). if you don't know which router is device's gateway, you perform trace route... Regards,
  5. does R1 have route to 25.0.0.0/8 and does R2 have route to 13.0.0.1? I guess not.
  6. ROUTE was for me quite hard, but it's this "new verison" of exam... there were a lot of tricky questions. I was quite dissapointed on MPLS - it's only L3 VPNs .. no pseudowires, AToM, TE, ... the good stuff BGP was ok I guess... you need to understand it deeply. QOS was tricky. a lot of stuff about frame-relay, auto-qos, point-to-point links etc... Usually "we" don't have much work with QOS - bandwidth is cheap . At least in EU. I guess ROUTE & QOS was hardest for me.
  7. huh you can't I guess.. to be able to do this, router would need to connect to server and check it's content.
  8. That's why I love this exam. Topology remains the same and is publicly available, but for each ticket or question, there's small difference - and connection end to end isn't working. And you need to answer 3questions for each ticket: Where is the problem (which device)? What technology is in use at this ticket? What command you need to set to solve the problem. You can issue different show commands on any device in topology, but no config commands. How to approach this exam? Quite hard - you need to know a lot of technologies/protocols and you need to know how to check it & solve the problem. This exam was for me quite easy - because I have a few years of experiences on networking.I also bought book "CCNP TSHOOT 642-832 Official Certification Guide" but honestly it didn't help much. If you checked dumps then you probably know all possible technologies that could be the problem (ospf, redistribution, stp, vlans, etc...). So you only need to learn all that In this exam, dumps can't help you. That's why I love it
  9. I'm also thinking about studing checkpoint firewalls. all I found on internet is cbt nuggets videos. about simulators, afaik you can install firewall on any PC - it runs on some linux platform, but i'm not 100% sure about that. The problem could be with getting image. Regards, Ziga
  10. spanning-tree should block broadcast storms. but all switches should support it. it's hard to locate the source. most likely is some loopback. check fiber interfaces or some users that are connecing some cables to switches
  11. Hi guys, I have same problem and I need some clarification. I have same config as Pankaj_7 had - 3 routers in chain runing ibgp without any igp. ISP_R1 >>> ISP_R3 >>>> ISP_R2 Routes that R2 is advertising are not reachable by R1 because of inaccessable next-hop (and vice-versa). Isn't command "next-hop-self" in use for this case?? Or does this command works only in ebgp? I also have route-reflector-client in R3 for both neighbors. Regards, Ziga
  12. there are only 3 videos about MPLS in one old video series - ISCW exam 6 Multiprotocol Label Switching: The Concepts 964 00:41:38 7 Multiprotocol Label Switching: Frame Mode Configuration 440 00:16:32 8 Multiprotocol Label Switching: Understanding MPLS VPNs 500 00:28:20 But I wouldn't BUY whole video series just for these 3videos. It's mostly theory...
  13. wow all negative answers. I don't see big issues with this. I assume they're all located in same geographical location/same building. If you have reliable DHCP server and decent router, I don't see any big problems... Problem would be broadcast storm if some fiber gets looped Problem definitely is with broadcast traffic that windows PCs are generating. Problem would be with security ... but not a lot of people are hackers I remember reading somewhere that largest recommended broadcast domain is 500devices.
  14. Technically speaking BPDU is not a 'packet', but a 'frame'. And it's as small as it can be= 60bytes.
  15. you could apply policing on his IP/interface. Let's say 2M/0.5M down/up