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RIPv2

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RIPv2 Summary

 

The characteristics of RIPv2 follow :

 

 Distance-vector protocol.

 

 Use UDP port 520.

 

 Makes Automatic summarization on network Class boundary.

 

 Classless protocol (supports VLSMs).

 

 Have the power to shut the Auto-summarization And make a configured manual Summarization.

 

 Supports VLSMs.

 

 Metric is router hop count.

 

 Maximum hop count is 15; infinite (unreachable) routes have a metric of 16.

 

 Periodic route updates sent every 30 seconds to multicast address 224.0.0.9.

 

 25 routes per RIP message (24 if authentication is used).

 

 Invalid route marked after 180 sec.

 

 Flush timer is 280 sec.

 

 Hold-down timer 180 sec.

 

 Supports authentication.

 

 Implements split horizon with poison reverse.

 

 Implements triggered updates.

 

 Subnet mask included in route entry.

 

 Administrative distance for RIPv2 is 120.

 

 Used in small, flat networks or at the edge of larger networks.

 

 

 

Kindly check attachment for Full RIPv2

Hope it might help

RIPv2_CCNP..doc

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I was one of those who mock at this RIPv2, i was always think why such protocol still alive in todays network? how its still able to survive not like dead IGRP? and who want to use it anyway? untill i visit a friend of mine, he's a network engineer at a big bank here in my country, they have 26 branches and they are using RIPv2! i didn't believe it until i saw that beauty "R" in the routing table. He simply said " If i can run this simple routing protocol and it still can give me what i want, why do i need to run a complex headache "OSPF"?

 

And he was right about it, i mean take a close look at what is written here about the "RIPv2" characteristics, its all here:

 

+VLSM.

+Multicast updates.

+Aggregation.

+Authentication.

+Compare it to the "OSPF" you don't need a router with a sufficient resources MEM & processor to run the sophisticated SPF calculations. Any small branch or even SOHO router will work great with RIP.

 

What else an Admin want to be happy?

 

Now i know why its still there up and beat. :)

 

Great!

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I was one of those who mock at this RIPv2, i was always think why such protocol still alive in todays network? how its still able to survive not like dead IGRP? and who want to use it anyway? untill i visit a friend of mine, he's a network engineer at a big bank here in my country, they have 26 branches and they are using RIPv2! i didn't believe it until i saw that beauty "R" in the routing table. He simply said " If i can run this simple routing protocol and it still can give me what i want, why do i need to run a complex headache "OSPF"?

 

And he was right about it, i mean take a close look at what is written here about the "RIPv2" characteristics, its all here:

 

+VLSM.

+Multicast updates.

+Aggregation.

+Authentication.

+Compare it to the "OSPF" you don't need a router with a sufficient resources MEM & processor to run the sophisticated SPF calculations. Any small branch or even SOHO router will work great with RIP.

 

What else an Admin want to be happy?

 

Now i know why its still there up and beat. :)

 

Great!

 

Thanks , you also can turn of the multicast updates , and use unicast ;)

 

Its used till now cuz it works :)

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Thanks , you also can turn of the multicast updates , and use unicast ;)

 

Its used till now cuz it works :)

 

Ahmed,

 

Then allow me to post the RIPv2 unicast feature:

 

From CISCO site:

 [b]Allow Unicast Updates for RIP[/b]

Because RIP is normally a broadcast protocol, in order for RIP routing updates to reach nonbroadcast networks, you must configure the Cisco IOS software to permit this exchange of routing information. To do so, use the following command in router configuration mode:

[b]neighbor ip-address[/b]
    
To control the set of interfaces with which you want to exchange routing updates, you can disable the sending of routing updates on specified interfaces by configuring the [b]passive-interface[/b] command.

 

RFC 2453

 

In order to reduce unnecessary load on those hosts which are not
   listening to RIP-2 messages, an IP multicast address will be used for
   periodic broadcasts.  The IP multicast address is 224.0.0.9.  Note
   that IGMP is not needed since these are inter-router messages which
   are not forwarded.

   On NBMA networks, unicast addressing may be used.  However, if a
   response addressed to the RIP-2 multicast address is received, it
   should be accepted.

Edited by kIdMaN
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<!--coloro:#FF0000--><span style="color:#FF0000"><!--/coloro--><!--sizeo:4--><span style="font-size:14pt;line-height:100%"><!--/sizeo-->RIPv2 Summary<!--sizec--></span><!--/sizec--><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

 

<!--coloro:#0000FF--><span style="color:#0000FF"><!--/coloro--><b>The characteristics of RIPv2 follow :</b><!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->

 

 Distance-vector protocol.

 

Use UDP port 520.

 

 Makes Automatic summarization on network Class boundary.

 

 Classless protocol (supports VLSMs).

 

 Have the power to shut the Auto-summarization And make a configured manual Summarization.

 

 Supports VLSMs.

 

 Metric is router hop count.

 

 Maximum hop count is 15; infinite (unreachable) routes have a metric of 16.

 

 Periodic route updates sent every 30 seconds to multicast address 224.0.0.9.

 

 25 routes per RIP message (24 if authentication is used).

 

 Invalid route marked after 180 sec.

 

 Flush timer is 280 sec.

 

 Hold-down timer 180 sec.

 

 Supports authentication.

 

 Implements split horizon with poison reverse.

 

 Implements triggered updates.

 

 Subnet mask included in route entry.

 

 Administrative distance for RIPv2 is 120.

 

 Used in small, flat networks or at the edge of larger networks.

 

 

 

Kindly check attachment for Full RIPv2

Hope it might help

 

 

RIP works on which layer???????

 

In red

 

Mark

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The OSI Model

7. Application Layer

NNTP · SIP · SSI · DNS · FTP · Gopher · HTTP · NFS · NTP · SMPP · SMTP · SNMP · Telnet (more)

6. Presentation Layer

MIME · XDR · SSL · TLS

5. Session Layer

Named Pipes · NetBIOS · SAP

4. Transport Layer

TCP · UDP · PPTP · L2TP · SCTP

3. Network Layer

IP · ICMP · IPsec · IGMP

2. Data Link Layer

ARP · CSLIP · SLIP · Frame Relay · ITU-T G.hn DLL

1. Physical Layer

RS-232 · V.35 · V.34 · I.430 · I.431 · T1 · E1 · 802.3 Ethernet · 10BASE-T · 100BASE-TX · POTS · SONET · DSL · 802.11a/b/g/n PHY · ITU-T G.hn PHY

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Hi guyz,pls how do i get my profile thingy edited, I'll love for all to know my status and stand point firstly. :unsure:

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+Compare it to the "OSPF" you don't need a router with a sufficient resources MEM & processor to run the sophisticated SPF calculations. Any small branch or even SOHO router will work great with RIP.

I don't understand this argument at all.

SPF calculations are not sophisticated, it's actually a very simple algorithm, why would it require much processor resources? It ran fine many decades ago on kiloherz processors, why any modern routers would have problems with it? Memory requirements are also almost nothing. How much memory it requires? Maybe several dozen kilobytes in a moderately large network. It's nothing for any modern router, no matter how low end it is. Also, while OSPF sends only things that changed, RIP on the other hand periodically sends its whole routing table, however huge it is. As far as I can see, it's actually RIP that needs more processing power and memory to process those whole routing table updates, than OSPF which has little traffic and very simple algorithm for CPU (I still can't understand why anyone finds it complex, it may be complex for human to understand, but it doesn't require much CPU processing power, it consists of a series of very simple calculations). And in any case, both of those protocols were developed very long ago, when CPUs had kilohertz frequencies and less than 1MB of memory, and they worked fine even then, so I cannot see any reason why they would be problematic for any modern router, even home routers can run it just fine with thousands of routes.

I think there is no reason to use RIP because of its timers which don't allow very fast convergence (even when tweaked) and also things like when failure in one part of network can cause connectivity loss in another part of network because of holddown timers.

Edited by Arp_
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Arp,

 

the problem is with the actual computation complexity of ensuring loop-free topology in the network. in mathematical terms Dijkstra is O(|E|+|V|log|V|) whereas BF is O(|V||E|) so the difference is striking. the problem is that you are bind by protocol timers and your packet forwarding keeps your CPU busy with interrupts. So if you had a SOHO router that has dataplane separate from control plane you won't have problem.

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