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IPV6

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IPv6

 

Why using Ipv6?

 

IPv4 has only about 4.3 billion addresses available—in theory, and we know that we don’t even get to use all of those. There really are only about 250 million addresses that can be assigned to devices.

There are a lot of reports that give us all kinds of numbers, but all you really need to think about to convince yourself that I’m not just being an alarmist is the fact that there are about 6.5 billion people in the world today, and it’s estimated that just over 10 percent of that population is connected to the Internet, which means will run out of them, and it’s going to happen within a few years.

 

That statistic is basically screaming at us the ugly truth that based on IPv4’s capacity, every person can’t even have a computer—let alone all the other devices we use with them. I have more than one computer, and it’s pretty likely you do too. And I’m not even including in the mix phones, laptops, game consoles, fax machines, routers, switches, and a mother lode of other devices we use every day! So I think I’ve made it pretty clear that we’ve got to do something before we run out of addresses and lose the ability to connect with each other as we know it. And that “something” just happens to be implementing IPv6.

 

The problem of IPv4 address exhaustion was recognized in the early 1990s, when various experts made projections showing that if the increasing rate of the allotment of IPv4 addresses continued, the entire address space could be depleted in just a few short years. A newversion of IPknown in the development stage as IP Next Generation or IPng, and which is now IPv6was the proposed solution. But it was recognized that developing the new standards would take time, and that a short-term solution to IPv4 address depletion also was needed.

 

That short-term solution was Network Address Translation (NAT), which allows multiple hosts to share one or a few public IP addresses. Behind the NAT device, private IP addresses are used.

NAT has been so successful in slowing IPv4 address depletion, and has become such a standard part of most networks, that to this day many still question the need for a new version of IP. But the widespread use of NAT has changed the open, transparent, peer-to-peer Internet into something much more like a huge collection of client-server networks. Users are seen as being connected around the "edge" of the Internet, and services flow out to them.

 

Although most of the IPv6 standards were completed years ago, it is only recently that serious interest in migrating from IPv4 to IPv6 has been shown. There are two fundamental drivers behind the growing recognition of the need for IPv6.

The first is widespread vision of new applications using core concepts such as mobile IP, service quality guarantees, end-to-end security, grid computing, and peer-to-peer networking. NAT stifles innovation in these areas, and the only way to get NAT out of the way is to make public IP addresses abundant and readily available.

 

The second fundamental driver for IPv6 is the rapid modernization of heavily populated countries such as India and China. A compelling statistic is that the number of remaining unallocated IPv4 addresses is almost the same as the population of China: about 1.3 billion.With its aggressive expansion of its Internet infrastructure, China alone in the near future will represent an unsupportable pressure on an already strained IPv4 address pool. In India, with a population size close to China's, 4- and 5-layer NAT hierarchies exist just to support the present demands for IP addresses.

 

IPv6 replaces the 32-bit IPv4 address with a 128-bit address, making 340 trillion trillion trillion IP addresses available. That number will meet the demands for public IP addresses, and answer the needs of the two fundamental drivers discussed here, well into the foreseeable future.

 

Check attachment for more details & cmds

 

IPv6_CCNP.doc

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Hi ,

 

unable to open the document,

 

Hello pal, have downloaded it from here , and opened it, its fine which office ver are you using ?

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Part about the Link local could you please add that IPv4 has also a link local address in the case of dhcp failure device could assign itself a 169.254.x.x, however it's not that flexible than in IPv6.And i have a question from your perspective what is the most common method to migrate existing ipv4 infrastructre to ipv6? And what comes to my mind is that why IPv6 host even have to use Solicited-node multicast (aka arp) to determine destinations mac address, if it already have destination IPv6 address it could simple omit FFFE int he middle of the interface identifier.

 

PS: I have just downloaded the doc, it works fine with OO,

Edited by thead
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Hello Friends,

 

I am not able to open IPv6 doc also.

 

Able to open RIPV2,EIGRP and OSPF.

 

Could anybody please help me.

 

 

 

Thanks,

Leela.

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Hello Friends,

 

I am not able to open IPv6 doc also.

 

Able to open RIPV2,EIGRP and OSPF.

 

Could anybody please help me.

 

 

 

Thanks,

Leela.

 

Which word office ver is your using

 

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No problems opening the document!! :D

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I am using Office 2003 :mellow:

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How can I configure address: 2001:a:b:c::1/60 on NIC of XP PCs?

I don't know the command which configure that adress with subnet mask /40. Pls help me.

Thanks in advance.

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How can I configure address: 2001:a:b:c::1/60 on NIC of XP PCs?

I don't know the command which configure that adress with subnet mask /40. Pls help me.

Thanks in advance.

 

___________________________________

 

Hi Friend,

 

I've got this link for you from Microsoft.

Because I am, as you not yet that familiar with IPv6.

 

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb878102.aspx

 

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/thankyou.aspx?familyId=b3611543-58b5-4ccc-b6ce-677ebb2a520d&displayLang=en

 

It's a lot of reading but it should help (I think). :unsure:

Edited by BobyT
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Hi,

 

Cannot dowload the file. Everytime i try, it does not download the full 556kB. Is there a zipped version that can be downloaded?

Thx

:wacko:

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Hi,

 

Cannot dowload the file. Everytime i try, it does not download the full 556kB. Is there a zipped version that can be downloaded?

Thx

:wacko:

 

Try to download this pdf-file then

 

:rolleyes:

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Can you pleas elaborate the differences between Link Local Address & Site Local address. (If Possible With Examples)

1) Where are both of the addresses used? (Functional Area)

By a link local address, I thought of an example. A link local address can be used in in a Vlan, wherein, no routing is required, all the hosts are connected under same Vlan. What all other purposes is a link local address used for?

By a site local address, I understand that site is an autonomous system, or area. Wherein there are several different networks. A site local address can be routed only within the site but not into the public world. But again, I am confused with the above examples that came out of my mind. Please explain.

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Can you pleas elaborate the differences between Link Local Address & Site Local address. (If Possible With Examples)

1) Where are both of the addresses used? (Functional Area)

By a link local address, I thought of an example. A link local address can be used in in a Vlan, wherein, no routing is required, all the hosts are connected under same Vlan. What all other purposes is a link local address used for?

By a site local address, I understand that site is an autonomous system, or area. Wherein there are several different networks. A site local address can be routed only within the site but not into the public world. But again, I am confused with the above examples that came out of my mind. Please explain.

 

 

 

 

The differences between Link Local Address & Site Local address:

 

Link local:

Just think of APIPA; the automatic configuration of IP addresses in the range from 169.254.1.0 to 169.254.254.255, used in both IPv4 and IPv6 assigned automaticaly by a host operating system when no IP addressing assignment method is available, such as a DHCP server.

 

(from: http://en.wikikpedia.org/wiki/link-local_address)

 

Site Local:

Still have to read about that one, I am just diving into this stuff so.. :rolleyes:

If you figuer it out please let me know ;)

 

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hai

 

 

i have question.... if one system is assigned with ipv6 ip address and another system is assigned with ipv4.. will they able to communicate each other... if so how?..

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If one person is speaking only Chinese and another person is only speaking Spanish - can they communicate? No! What do they need? A translator.

 

In the network world you call the translator NAT-PT (network address translation with protocol translation) which allows communication between IPv4 and IPv6 hosts.

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Halo!!! my fellow networking and data communication guyz, am new here and this is my very first post, :rolleyes: . Can't wait to hv fun sharing my ideas,configs, little xperience and also learning a lot from here(e.g my BSCI exams come up in less than a week). Great post 'BTW' on IPv6.

 

IPCamara arrives folks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)

HI!

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I have a question :).

 

Ok, about my question maybe it's a bit clear now: I need NAT-PT. Still can this be used for redistribution, too? I doubt.

 

Next one - a screaming one - in the doc attached you said:

The first 4 bits of the Global unicast address are always 0001 as for this writing. (2000::/3).

 

1. 2000:: is this in base 16 or is it on base 10?

2. 0001 0000 (1st octet of the IPv6) = 16 (if were to represent the result using base 10) and 0001 0000 = 10 (using numeration base 16). Then how did we reach 2 as the first digit?

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Ok, about my question maybe it's a bit clear now: I need NAT-PT. Still can this be used for redistribution, too? I doubt.

 

Next one - a screaming one - in the doc attached you said:

The first 4 bits of the Global unicast address are always 0001 as for this writing. (2000::/3).

 

1. 2000:: is this in base 16 or is it on base 10?

2. 0001 0000 (1st octet of the IPv6) = 16 (if were to represent the result using base 10) and 0001 0000 = 10 (using numeration base 16). Then how did we reach 2 as the first digit?

You need to understand that IPv4 and IPv6 are completely different protocols. They don't know each other, they don't understand each other, they are separate universes on their own. You find this often described as 'playing ships in the night'. So there is no way to just redistribute one into the other, but instead you need protocol translation.

 

This is clearly a typo: The first 4 bits of the Global unicast address are always 0001 as for this writing. (2000::/3).

 

Instead the correct phrase is "The first 3 bits of the Global unicast address are always 001 as for this writing. (2000::/3)." as clearly indicated by the /3 prefix.

 

2000::/3 is of course base 16 aka HEX just like all IPv6 addresses. By definition all IPv6 addresses are written in HEX only. If you convert it to binary you will see that this global prefix will result a range of addresses from 2000:: up to 3FFF::.

 

HTH

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You need to understand that IPv4 and IPv6 are completely different protocols. They don't know each other, they don't understand each other, they are separate universes on their own. You find this often described as 'playing ships in the night'. So there is no way to just redistribute one into the other, but instead you need protocol translation.

 

This is clearly a typo: The first 4 bits of the Global unicast address are always 0001 as for this writing. (2000::/3).

 

Instead the correct phrase is "The first 3 bits of the Global unicast address are always 001 as for this writing. (2000::/3)." as clearly indicated by the /3 prefix.

 

2000::/3 is of course base 16 aka HEX just like all IPv6 addresses. By definition all IPv6 addresses are written in HEX only. If you convert it to binary you will see that this global prefix will result a range of addresses from 2000:: up to 3FFF::.

 

HTH

 

Thank you ! Then I will study the NAT-PT and hope I will answer my question. Any NAT-PT configs will be welcomed.

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Site Local:

Still have to read about that one, I am just diving into this stuff so.. <img src="http://www.sadikhov.com/forum/public/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/rolleyes.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":rolleyes:" border="0" alt="rolleyes.gif" />

If you figuer it out please let me know <img src="http://www.sadikhov.com/forum/style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/wink.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=";)" border="0" alt="wink.gif" />

 

Site local is to RFC 1918 addresses. But as far as I remember, this has been deprecated in favor of Unique local addressing. There are differences. Even the CIDR ranges are different.

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